Protecting Children in a Complex Society

Quote of the Week:  All children could and should be inventors of their own theories, critics of other people’s ideas, analyzers of evidence, and makers of their own personal marks on this most complex world.         Deborah Meier

For those of you who are familiar with the Hunger Games, you will remember it certainly wasn’t a society that protected its children.  Thinking about our own society, how well do we protect our children—not just physically but their emotional and mental wellbeing?  Today, adults are debating gun control and the Second Amendment, which should be debated.  As those conversations are occurring, adults are not always cognizant that there are children listening and watching.  They’re watching television images of teachers learning how to use guns and how to defend themselves.  They’re watching movies and programs about terrorism, horrific crimes, and violence.  They overhear media, regardless of parental advisories that what follows may not be suitable for children, and it’s out there before it’s possible to click a program off.  There is little to no separation between what is appropriate for children and what is geared for adult listening and watching.  To what extent are we, as a society, willing to protect children from losing their innocence about life sooner than they should?

Perhaps reading and discussing books like The Hunger Games give adults opportunities to prepare children for the darker side of society.  If we’re not willing to redefine individual freedom—where does one’s freedom and rights begin and end, then we need to give children the critical thinking skills they need to navigate the very complex society in which we live.

As we continue to develop lesson plans for The Hunger Games, we are attempting to provide students with opportunities to develop and use critical thinking skills to have those meaningful discussions that just may help them understand the world in which we all live.

The Hunger Games Character Analysis Lesson Plan  is a free download on our Teachers Pay Teachers store.  Check it out!

hunger games character analysishttp://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Hunger-Games-Character-Analysis-Lesson-Plan

Advertisements
Explore posts in the same categories: Adolescent Literature, education, English Language Arts, Hunger Games, Lesson Plans, Teaching The Hunger Games

Tags: , , ,

You can comment below, or link to this permanent URL from your own site.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: