Archive for the ‘Reading’ category

We Love Bookmarks!

June 14, 2016

We love bookmarks. Students love bookmarks.  And so, in many of our products, we include bookmarks.  We even offerIvan Bookmarks free bookmarks to teachers on Teachers Pay Teachers.

7 Ways to Use Bookmarks

  1. Form pairs, trios, and/or quads. Distribute the number of different bookmarks equal to the number of pairs, trios, or quads you want to form. For example, to form quads, reproduce four copies of each individual bookmark. Distribute bookmarks and direct students to form a group of four by finding three other students who have the same bookmark they have.
  2. Use as a writing prompt. Distribute bookmarks. Direct students to read and ponder the quotes. Next, ask students to write a short reflection on what the quotes means to them. Invite students to share their reflections with an elbow partner.
  3. Investigate the speaker. Use the bookmarks to form student trios. Direct trios to read and ponder the quotes. Ask trios to answer the following questions: What kind of person would say this? To whom would this person address this quote? What kind of situation would be appropriate for this quote? Invite trios to share their quotes and their responses to the questions.
  4. Review the text. After students have read the novel, story, or play, distribute a variety of bookmark quotes. Direct students to read their quotes and jot down the incident in the text connected to that quote. Next, direct students to find another student who had the same bookmark quote and compare responses.
  5. Choose a favorite. On a table, lay out bookmark quotes and as students enter the classroom, invite them to choose a favorite bookmark quote. Ask students to jot down a few notes on the back of the bookmark quote what this quote means to them. Invite students to share their responses. Consider this activity for a morning meeting or talking circle.
  6. Make your own bookmark. Distribute blank bookmarks and direct students to write a favorite quote from a text you are currently studying in class. In addition to the quote, ask students to include a graphic or illustration that connects to the quote they chose. Invite students to share their quotes with the class. Consider collecting the bookmark quotes and displaying them on a bulletin board in your classroom.
  7. Use as a bookmark

We hope you love our bookmarks!bookmark this

Free bookmarks for The One and Only Ivan

Free friendship bookmarks

Free bookmarks for Esperanza Rising

Who Doesn’t Love a Field Trip?

February 21, 2014

“A good zoo,” Stella said, “is a large domain. A wild cage. A safe place to be. It has room to roam and humans who don’t hurt.” She pauses, considering her words. “A good zoo is how humans make amends”.  –Katherine Applegate, The One and Only Ivan

When you hear the words, field trip, what comes to mind?  I immediately go back to fourth grade and going to Proctor and Gamble to see how soap is made.  And, coming home with samples—WOW!  As a kid I loved those field trips to factories to see how things were made.  Maybe it started with a visit to the Kool-Aid factory with my Dad, who drove a truck for an electrical construction company.  Every summer I got to ride along with him while he made deliveries to the electricians and one day, it was the Kool-Aid factory.  And I did come home with lots of samples—the envy of the neighborhood, but I digress.

For those of you who are teachers, when you hear the words, field trip, you may think about all the planning, coordinating, and hoping the buses are on time.  Another thing to think about is 8 Ways to Liven Up the Museum Field Trip by Stacey Goodman.  Goodman offers several great ideas to prepare students to get more out of field trips.

While spring does not feel like it is around the corner in many parts of the country, planning a spring field trip can make it feel closer.  If you are planning a field trip to a zoo, reading The One and Only Ivan now might be a great way to prepare your students for that trip.  It’s a wonderful story, gently raising issues about the humaneness of zoos.  Check out our unit plan and free bookmarks for The One and Only Ivan!  Good luck planning those field trips!

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/liven-up-museum-field-trip-stacey-goodman

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/The-One-and-Only-Ivan-Unit-Plan-1053796

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/The-One-and-Only-Ivan-Free-Bookmarks-1054840

Ivan Bookmarks

Ivan Cover

goodman-museum-field-trip-flickr

5 Books Anyone Concerned about Education Should Read

January 26, 2014

American education is at a crossroads. There are two paths in front of us: One in which we destroy our strengths in order to “catch up” with others in test scores and one in which we build on our strengths so we can keep the lead in innovation and creativity. Yong Zhao

Anyone interested in a different perspective on PK-12 education and learning might find the following five books fascinating reading. These books will showcase a variety of perspectives that may challenge or change the way you currently perceive educational practices as well as the way in which you perceive learning in general. Any one of these books would make an excellent choice for a study group or book club.

 Catching Up ZhaoCatching Up or Leading the Way: American Education in the Age of Globalization by Yong Zhao

The above quote is from the introduction and best describes the importance of what Zhao is advocating in his book.  Zhao challenges readers to consider the criticism of schools, which he thinks is misleading and misinformed, while taking into account the impact of globalization on the economic and social landscape. Ultimately, Zhao advocates for leaders to take five actions to ensure a world-class education for American students—actions that are realistic and doable.

Armstrong Best SchoolsThe Best Schools: How Human Development Should Inform Educational Practice by Thomas Armstrong

Armstrong makes a strong case for changing the way we talk about education, moving away from academic achievement discourse toward human development discourse. He argues for developmentally appropriate practices that emphasize play for early childhood learning, theme and project-based learning for elementary students, active learning that focuses on social, emotional and metacognitive needs of middle school students, and mentoring, apprenticeships, and cooperative education for high school students.

A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future by Daniel H. Pink

Both Zhao and Pink use the words innovation and creativity. According to Pink, the 18th century was the Agriculture Age (farmers), the 19th century, the Industrial Age (factory workers), the 20th century, the Information Age (knowledge workers), and the 21st century, the Conceptual Age (creators and empathizers). In order to maintain our lead in innovation and creativity, Pink advocates that we need to complement our L-Directed reasoning (L for left-brain functions) by mastering six essential R-Directed aptitudes (R for right-brain functions).

Those six high-concept, high-touch senses are:

1. Not just function but also DESIGN.Pink Whole New Mind

2. Not just argument but also STORY.

3. Not just focus but also SYMPHONY.

4. Not just logic but also EMPATHY

5. Not just seriousness but also PLAY.

6. Not just accumulation but also MEANING

The rest of the book defines and describes these six senses with a variety of activities to develop and refine those senses—of which many are fun and easily adapted to the classroom.

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel H. Pink

For anyone who teaches any age student, this book is a must-read. Pink supports his theory of motivation with numerous research studies and anecdotes. While it isn’t a surprise that humans are intrinsically motivated, Pink addresses rewards in the following list:

CARROTS AND STICKS: The Seven Deadly FlawsPink Drive

1. They can extinguish intrinsic motivation.

2. They can diminish performance.

3. They can crush creativity.

4. They can crowd out good behavior.

5. They can encourage cheating, shortcuts, and unethical behavior.

6. They can become addictive.

7. They can foster short-term thinking.

 Those who have read Alfie Kohn will appreciate the support that Pink provides for Kohn’s ideas about punishments and rewards.  Included is a list of 15 books for further reading.

The Invisible Gorilla and Other Ways Our Intuitions Deceive Us by Christopher Chabris and Daniel Simons

Of all the books listed, this is the one that will definitely challenge your belief that you see yourself and the world as they really are, but in reality, we’re all missing a lot. The topic is intriguing, the writing is witty, and the answer to why we all see the same situation in different ways becomes more apparent. And for those of us who believe in intuition, this book may change all that. We may want to rethink how we teach and how we keep our students attentive.invisible gorilla

Our goal is to incorporate many of the concepts in these books into the teacher materials we create.  Check out the books and check out our teacher materials at http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Browse/Search:surviving+to+thriving+ljl

Surviving to Thriving TPT

Banned Book Week – September 22-28, 2013

September 25, 2013

What is freedom of expression? Without the freedom to offend, it ceases to exist. Salman Rushdie

If there’s one American belief I hold above all others, it’s that those who would set themselves up in judgment on matters of what is “right” and what is “best” should be given no rest; that they should have to defend their behavior most stringently.
Stephen King

Although there are those who wish to ban my books because I have used language that is painful, I have chosen to use the language that was spoken during the period, for I refuse to whitewash history. The language was painful and life was painful for many African Americans, including my family.  I remember the pain.  Mildred D. Taylor, The Land

BBW_shortlist_120x180

I wonder if those who ban books read those books.  I wonder if those who ban books understand that banning a book just makes it that more desirable.  I wonder why anyone would think they are the ones who should decide what we read and what we should not read.  Sometimes I just wonder.

This week is Banned Book Week.  It’s a great topic to discuss with your students, your colleagues, your friends, and your family of readers.  If you are wondering what to read next, check out the list of banned books for 2013.  Check with your librarian for additional lists of banned books and probably lots of engaging activities that focus on banned books, censorship, and freedom.  Check out the ALA Store for products that call attention to banned books.

Ponder why any book might be censored or banned and to what purpose.

Freadom13Poster_11x17

Hunger Games Unit medium-645401-1

Resources

American Library Association

http://www.ala.org/bbooks/

American Library Association Store

http://www.alastore.ala.org/SearchResult.aspx?CategoryID=269

Banned Books Online

http://www.digital.library.upenn.edu/books/banned-books.html

Banned Books

http://www.adlerbooks.com/banned.html

Phillips Library-Aurora University

http://libguides.aurora.edu/content.php?pid=63503&sid=2134998

American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression

http://www.abffe.org/?page=BBWPosters

Characters, Authors, Friends

September 11, 2013

Reading isn’t passive–I enter the story with the characters, breathe their air, feel their frustrations,
scream at them to stop when they’re
about to do something stupid, cry with
them, laugh with them.
Reading for me, is spending time with a friend.
A book is a friend.
You can never have too many.
Gary Paulsen

As I was reading yet another book by Victoria Huston, it struck me how much I enjoy her characters, her plots, and her writing.  And, how comfortable it is to read a book where you already know the characters and you can depend on a good story written in a style that resonates with your sense of good writing.  It’s like being friends with someone you don’t see on a regular basis, but when you do reconnect, you simply pick up where you left off.

I love when I discover a new author and take off on a path to locate every book he or she has written.  What’s better than finishing one book and picking up the same characters in the next book!  I just downloaded John Sanford’s latest book with Lucas Davenport, a character I have known for a long time.  Who is waiting for “W” (Sue Grafton) and finding out what Kinsey Millhone is doing?  Jack Reacher is still one of my favorite characters, so reading Lee Child is just a good time.

Then there are those books that are part of a series:  Harry Potter, The Hunger Games, Lois Lowry’s series, culminating with Son, Girl with a Dragon Tattoo, Lord of the Rings, etc.  While I have never been one to reread books (I always feel like there are too many new books to read), I have two sons, now grown men, who would read and reread and reread their favorite series.  Now I have an eleven year old granddaughter who loves to reread her favorite books.

My theory is that we read books by the same authors, and sometimes reread those books because there is a feeling of comfort that emerges when we are among those characters, plots, and authors who become part of our reading life.  Simply, they are best friends and always available.  Who are your favorite authors and characters?

Many of the book we have featured in our Teachers Pay Teachers store are books that have become part of our reading world–whether it is the inspiration found in Wonder and Mockingbird or the adventure in The Hunger Games and Son, these are the type of books that leave an impression on both students and adults.

Hunger Games Unit medium-645401-1           Son Book cover      Mockingbird medium-776321-1     images


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